Juneteenth

Updated: Jul 22

On Thursday, June 17, 2021,

President Biden signed legislation making Juneteenth, a federal holiday.

This is the first national holiday established in 38 years.

Juneteenth, Commemorates the End of Slavery in the United States. Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States. Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas, with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free (two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation). The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order; but with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General Granger’s regiment, the forces were finally strong enough to influence and overcome the resistance. The following year, on June 19, the first official Juneteenth celebrations took place in Texas. The original observances included prayer meetings and the singing of spirituals, and celebrants wore new clothes as a way of representing their newfound freedom. Within a few years, African Americans in other states were celebrating the day as well, making it an annual tradition. Celebrations have continued across the United States into the 21st century and typically include prayer and religious services, speeches, educational events, family gatherings and picnics, and festivals with music, food, and dancing. How Is Your Company Celebrating? Below is an article about how corporations are celebrating. We'd love to hear how your company is recognizing the newest national holiday. How corporate America is approaching Juneteenth, the newest national holiday (msn.com)

We believe that to go far, we must go together. Join us on Juneteenth as we Celebrate, Reflect and Connect.




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